CCP 7.2.u3 - Uncertain

Catalogue information
National Museum of Iraq
IM 135050
W 22307/53
UrukUruk, Ue XVIII/1 Schnittgraben, südl. Hä.
CDLI: 
P348583
Publication
Copy: 
SpTU 1 164
Photo: 
Uruk Foto Nr. 13101, 13107
Commentary
MiscellaneaUnknown

Broken

Base text: 
Uncertain
Tablet information
Babylonian
Fragment
Columns: 
1 (or >)
Lines: 
7
Size: 
3,5 × 1,5 × 1,7 cm
Achaemenid (5th cent - 331 BCE) (Uruk, Anu-ikṣur / Nippur / Babylon)
Bibliography

Frahm, 2011E. Frahm, Babylonian and Assyrian Text Commentaries. Origins of Interpretation. Ugarit-Verlag, 2011.: 260

Horowitz, 1998W. Horowitz, Mesopotamian Cosmic Geography. Eisenbrauns, 1998.: 275

Record
Jiménez, 11/2014 (Transliteration)
Jiménez, 11/2014 (Translation)
Jiménez, 11/2014 (Introduction)
Jiménez, 08/2016 (Commentary markup)
Fadhil & van Ess, 10/2017 (Museum number)
By Enrique Jiménez | Make a correction or suggestion
How to cite
Jiménez, E., 2014, “Commentary on Uncertain (CCP 7.2.u3),” Cuneiform Commentaries Project (E. Frahm, E. Jiménez, M. Frazer, and K. Wagensonner), 2013–2024; accessed May 24, 2024, at https://ccp.yale.edu/P348583. DOI: 10079/63xsjgq
© Cuneiform Commentaries Project (Citation Guidelines)
Introduction

This small fragment, published in copy only as SpTU 1 164, contains some glosses on an unknown text. It appears to mention the chthonic goddess Ereškigal, and it explains the Sumerian loanword kigalla, one of the names of the Netherworld, as the “land of the dead” (erṣetu ša mī[tūti]). It also mentions an aḫurrû, which is either the “younger son” or a “catamite.”1

Edition

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ccpo

SpTU 1, 164

Obverse
1'1'

[...]-um-ma [...]

...

2'2'

[...] x [...]

...

3'3'

[... dEREŠ].KI.GAL DINGIR-MEŠ i-bil-[...]

[...] Ereškigal [...] the gods [...],

4'4'

[...] ki-gal-la : KI šá mi-[tu-ti ...]

[...] kigallu means “the land of the dead” [...],

5'5'

[...] x x x-bad [...]

...

6'6'

[... ]MINú u a-ḫur-ri-i [...]1

[...] the second and the younger child [...].

7'7'

[...] x [...]

...

1The first preserved sign is not šá, but MIN. The parsing of the signs as šanû is very uncertain.