CCP 3.7.2.J - Alamdimmû 9-12 J

Catalogue information
British Museum
BM 38788
80-11-12,672
Babylon(Babylon)
CDLI: 
P461178
Commentary
DivinationPhysiognomicAlamdimmû

ṣâtu 3b

Base text: 
Alamdimmû 9-12
Commentary no: 
J
Tablet information
Babylonian
Complete tablet
Columns: 
1
Lines: 
31
Size: 
5,2 × 3,3 × 0,9 cm
Neo/Late Babylonian, specifics unknown
Bibliography

CAD Š/1 109b[On line r 13: úr.gìr = [š]u-⸢ḫarše-e-pi BM 38788 r. 13 (courtesy I. L. Finkel).]

CAD Š/2 61b[sag.ḫa.ma.al = šar-ḫu BM 38788:2 (comm., courtesy I. L. Finkel).]

Finkel, 2014bI. Finkel, Remarks on Cuneiform Scholarship and the Babylonian Talmud, in Encounters by the Rivers of Babylon: Scholarly Conversations between Jews, Iranians, and Babylonians, U. Gabbay and Secunda, S. Mohr Siebeck, 2014, pp. 307-316.: 313 fn. 13

Record
Jiménez, 01/2015 (Unpublised Transliteration)
Jiménez, 01/2015 (Translation)
Jiménez, 01/2015 (Introduction)
Jiménez, 08/2016 (Commentary markup)
By Enrique Jiménez |
Cite this edition
Jiménez, E., “Commentary on Alamdimmû 9-12 (CCP no. 3.7.2.J),” Cuneiform Commentaries Project (2017), at http://ccp.yale.edu/P461178 (accessed September 23, 2017)
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Introduction

This hitherto unpublished tablet from Babylon contains a short but complete commentary on the last four chapters of the physiognomic divinatory series Alamdimmû. Only a few words from each chapter are commented upon: five words from Alamdimmû IX, three from Alamdimmû X, eleven from Alamdimmû XI, and six from Alamdimmû XII. Each of these sections is followed by a rubric classifying the text above as a ṣâtu 3b commentary, and providing the incipit of the tablet in question.

 

The text of the chapters dealt with in the commentary (Alamdimmû X-XII) is poorly known: not a single manuscript of Alamdimmû IX and XI-XII can be identified at present, and Alamdimmû X is attested only fragmentarily.1 In consequence only one entry can be related to the base text the commentary refers to: l. 9, which glosses the logogram šà.maḫ of Alamdimmû X 45-46 as karšu, “stomach.”

 

The writings explained in this text are in many cases unique. For instance, the apparently logographic writing sag.ḫa.ma.al is said in l. 2 to mean šarḫu, “proud”; whereas line 27 explains the logogram maš.šu.gál as sikiltu, “property.” In the former case, the writing is elsewhere unattested; in the latter, it is known only from the lexical list Nabnītu. In l. 26, both explanandum and explanans seem to be hapax legomena.

 

Besides explaining obscure writings, this commentary allows now for the first time reading correctly the incipit of Alamdimmû XI (line 23), which was damaged in the ancient catalogs that listed it (see note ad loc.).

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BM 038788 (unpublished unassigned ?) [commentaries]

Obverse
x85 obverse
1 1

SAG.⸢DU [x]

x-x-x

SAG.DU-[x] means ...

2 2

SAG.ḪA.MA.AL

šar-ḫu

SAG.̆ḪA.MA.AL means “proud.”

3 3

ku-um-mu-su

ra-áš-bi 1

“Fearsome” means “terrifying.”

4 4

UMBIN BABBAR

na-ba-li 2

“White toe” means namālu-disease.

5 5

UMBIN GE₆

ku-ra-ru

“Black toe” means kurāru-disease.


6 6

ṣa-a- u šu-ut pi-i šá * GÍD.DA 3

Lemmata and oral explanations relating to “If (his) neck is long.” (= Alamdimmû IX).


7 7

ḪÁŠ

em-šu

ḪÁŠ means “abdomen.”

8 8

ḪÁŠ

šap-ri

ḪÁŠ means “thigh.”

9 9

ŠÀ.⸢MAḪ

kar-šú

ŠÀ.MAḪ (= Alamdimmû X 45-46) means “stomach.”


10 10

ṣa-a- u šu⸣-ut pi-i šá * GABA DAGAL. 4

Lemmata and oral explanations relating to “If (his) chest is wide.” (= Alamdimmû X).


11 11

x

x⸣-ba-tu₄

... means ...

12 12

ZAG GU.⸢DU

tu-kul-ti qin?-na?-ti?

SAG GU.DU means “part of the buttocks.”

13 13

GIG.GIR

ku⸣-ra-ru

GIG.GIR means kurāru-disease.

bottom
14 14

x

pa⸣-qa-du

... means “to entrust.”

15 15

DÙL

GISSU

DÙL means “shade.”

reverse
16 16

i-te-en-ṣu-u

[x (x)] x

itenṣû means ...

17 17

BAR

[x]-⸢x⸣-tu₄

BAR means ...

18 18

ÚR GÌR

[šu]-⸢ḫar še-e-pi 5

ÚR GÌR means “Achiles' tendom.”

19 19

   

ši?⸣-si-it x

ankle [...].

20 20

du-uDU₁₁

tu-kul-⸢ti

KA, when read /du/, means “support” (of the buttocks).

21 21

[x]

e-⸢de⸣-[x]

...

22 22

x

ṣa-pa-pa 6

[...] means “to flutter.”


23 23

[ṣa-a-] u šu-ut pi-i šá * is-qu-bit GU₄ GAR 7

Lemmata and oral explanations relating to “If he has a cow’s hump.” (= Alamdimmû XI).


24 24

GUR₄

ba-a-lu

GUR₄ means “to be dominant.”

25 25

ALAN

la-a-nu

ALAN means “figure.”

26 26

ti-mi-ra-áš

mi-ra-šu-u 8

timirāš means mirāšû.

27 27

MAŠ.ŠU.GÁL

si-kil-tu₄ 9

MAŠ.ŠU.GÁL means “property.”

28 28

ḪÁŠ TE.GÙN.A

e-ri-mu 10

ḪÁŠ TE.GÙN.A means “mole.”

29 29

x⸣-ḫa-šu-šu

i-mi-ṣi 11

... means “it is sour.”

30 30

[?]di

um-mi-di

[ÚŠ]-di (?) means “it is leaning.”


top
31 31

[ṣa-a- u šu-ut pi-i šá * alam-dím-ma-a ...] x di 12

Lemmata and oral explanations relating to “If the form [...] (= Alamdimmû XII).

1Compare rašbu = kummusu in An IX 18.

2Compare perhaps Böck AfO Beih 27 (2000) p. 272 l. 102: * ṣu-up-ra-šu na-ma-li ma-la-a.

3The incipit of Alamdimmû IX is elsewhere attested as * -su GÍD.DA.

4The incipit of Alamdimmû X is elsewhere attested as * GABA-su GÍD.DA, “If his chest is long.”

5On ÚR GÌR as “Achiles’ tendom,” see Mirelman NABU 2008/65. The equation ÚR GÌR : šuḫār šēpi is also attested in Nabnītu X 224.

6No Sumerian equivalent of ṣabābu is known (CT 20 49 25, read BAR ú-ṣab-bab in AHw 1065a, is read differently in Koch AOAT 326 p. 167 l. 26).

7The reading of the incipit of Alamdimmû XI as proposed in Finkel Gs Sachs (1988) p. 151 has to be corrected accordingly (ND 4358+: * is!-qu!-bit! GU₄ GARin // BM 41237+ * is!-qu!-bit! GU₄ [GARin]).

8Both explanandum and explanans appear to be hapax legomena. The former perhaps represents the same word of Kassite origin that is attested in some Middle Babylonian texts as a color of horses and cattle (CAD T 418b and Brinkman NABU 1996/40). The word mirāšû is entirely unattested: it represents perhaps an attempt to provide an artificial Akkadian etymology to a foreign word.

9The equation is atested in Nabnītu XXI (= XXII) 154.

10Compare TE.GÙNgu.A : erimu in SB List of Diseases i 32 (MSL 9 p. 93).

11No obvious restoration suggests itself for the left column. The word in the right column is probably a form of emēṣu I, “to be sour,” or else of emēṣu II, “to be hungry.”

12This line should contain the incipit of Alamdimmû XII, which is only partially known from catalogs (see Finkel Gs Sachs [1988] p. 151 A 76 // B 44′ and Böck AfO Beih 27 p. 27a).

Photos by Enrique Jiménez

Courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum